Cognitive dysfunction after surgery the subject of new research supported in part by UF CTSI

Published: November 13th, 2012

Category: News, Research

Catherine Price, Ph.D.

Catherine Price, Ph.D., the study’s lead investigator and an assistant professor in the department of clinical and health psychology in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions

With the help of a new $2.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Nursing Research, a multidisciplinary team of UF investigators led by Catherine Price, Ph.D., will use brain imaging studies to determine which older adults are most likely to be affected by memory and thinking problems after major surgery.

The five-year study is also supported in part by UF’s Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. The UF Clinical and Translational Science Institute will help facilitate the research through its UF Clinical Research Center and REDCap database support services.

An assistant professor in the department of clinical and health psychology in the UF College of Public Health and Health Professions, Price hopes the study’s findings can eventually be applied to develop interventions that identify patients who need extra monitoring or certain anesthetic or surgical procedures to prevent cognitive dysfunction after surgery.

Price’s collaborators include Ann Horgas, Ph.D., an associate professor of adult and elderly nursing, and Cyndi Garvan, Ph.D., a biostatistician. The study’s medical team is composed of Hari Parvataneni, M.D., an associate professor in the department of orthopedic surgery, Mark Rice, M.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology, and Ilona Schmalfuss, M.D., an associate professor of radiology at UF and the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System. The imaging team includes Mingzhou Ding, Ph.D., a professor in the department of biomedical engineering, Thomas Mareci, Ph.D., a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and William Triplett, an information technology specialist.

Read more about the new study:
Memory loss, thinking problems after surgery the subject of new UF research