Research Day: CTSI and MD-PhD Program, May 15, 2020

Join us to celebrate the research of MD-PhD students, and CTSI trainees, scholars and pilot awardees representing multiple departments and colleges across the University of Florida. Attend the Zoom sessions below or click the links to learn more about the upcoming presentations.


Keynote speaker

Kafui Dzirasa, MD, PhD

Associate Professor at Duke University with appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, and Neurosurgery.

Dr. Kafui Dzirasa

Agenda


9:00 a.m.

Introduction to MD-PhD & CTSI Research Day

Adrian Tyndall, M.D., M.P.H., FACEP, FAAEM


9:20 a.m.

MD-PhD Presentations

William Dodd – Master of Ceremonies for MD-PhD

The MD-PhD Training Program is at the interface of discovery and development where we are transcending individual disciplines for the “team science” paradigm. Here, enthusiastic and interactive researchers, creative minds, and cutting-edge technology work together to apply and advance science. The goal of the MD-PhD Training Program is to enable scholars to obtain the best training in their intended research areas while working closely with an outstanding faculty.

Click here for more information about the presentations.


11:15 a.m.

Keynote Speaker

Kafui Dzirasa, PhD

Topic:

Translating Neuroscience: Obstacles and Opportunities


12:30 p.m.

Discussion with Dr. Dzirasa

Students will have an opportunity to meet with Dr. Dzirasa after his presentation.


1:00 p.m.

TL1 trainee presentations

The CTSI TL1 Training Program provides predoctoral trainees with the skills required to develop a career in multidisciplinary clinical and translational research. TL1 Teams are comprised of two or more PhD students from different degree programs in different colleges. Teams collaborate to develop new team-specific aims that expand the scope of their individual dissertation projects based on a common research interest, e.g., a human disease being investigated at different levels (molecular to population), with different experimental approaches or data analysis methods, and/or at different parts of the T0-T4 continuum.  

Click here for more information about the presentations.

KL2 scholar presentations

The KL2 Program is a multidisciplinary program for junior faculty, that provides two years of financial support and research training to develop the skills necessary to build a well-funded, collaborative career in clinical/ translational research.

Click here for more information about the presentations.

UF CTSI Pilot Awardee presentations

CTSI Pilot Project Awards support research across UF’s broad range of scientific disciplines. It is expected that all research supported by these awards will result in one or more publications in a peer-reviewed journal and will provide critical preliminary data to support extramural applications.

Click here for more information about the presentations.


watch the presentations online

Join the symposium

This MD-PhD research day is available online via UF'S video hosting site. Click below to join the stream and watch the presentations.

Contact us

For questions about the symposium, please contact Susan Gardner or William Dodd.


To learn more about any of the presentations and presenting scholars, view the posters, or to contact the presenters with questions or comments, click the corresponding presentation title link.

MD-PhD Presentations

presenter name Mentor presentation title
Frederick Ashby Coy Heldermon, MD, PhD GRE Enhancement of AAV Does Not Improve Transduction Efficiency
Jonathan Cho, PhD Dorina Avram, PhD Hectd3 promotes pathogenic Th17 lineage through Stat3 activation and Malt1 signaling in neuroinflammation
William Dodd Brian Hoh, MD, MBA Adropin as a novel protective factor after subarachnoid hemorrhage
Leanne Dumeny Larisa Cavallari, PharmD and Julio Duarte, PharmD, PhD NR3C2 Genotype is Associated with Spironolactone Response in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients
Henrietta Fasanya Dietmar Siemann, PhD and Hugh Fan, PhD Using a combination of Gangliosides and Cell Surface Vimentin as surface biomarkers for isolating Osteosarcoma Cells
Adam Grippin Duane Mitchell, MD, PhD and Jon Dobson, PhD Engineering nanoparticles to treat brain tumors
Chu Hsiao Connie Mulligan, PhD Beyond Bench to Bedside
Zachary Krumm Todd E. Golde, MD, PhD Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease
Lindsey Palm Scott Banks, PhD Determining how early after surgery should we study total knee arthroplasty mechanics?
Puchong Thirawatananond Todd Brusko, PhD Generation of islet-reactive Tregs to prevent diabetes in NOD mice
Aditya Mahadevan BS Rachael Seidler, PhD Functional Neural Changes in Response to Head-Down Tilt Bedrest with Elevated CO2 During a Sensorimotor Dual Task
Binh Nguyen, BS Carol Mathews, MD Visual Mismatch Negativity and Structural Connectivity in Hoarding Disorder
Yuxing Xia, BS Benoit Giasson, PhD Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies
Aditi Patel, PhD, MPH Elizabeth A. Shenkman, PhD Participant-Driven Goal Setting in the Management of Multiple, Complex Chronic Diseases: Preliminary Findings from the Wellness Incentives Navigation (WIN) Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Mathew Sebastian David Tran MD, PhD Pglyrp3, a novel critical regulator of breast cancer development and metastasis
Garrett Smith Thomas Foster PhD Impaired Pattern Separation During Aging is Associated with Altered Hippocampal Gene Transcription
Dan Stribling Rolf Renne, PhD Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology
Emily Winesett Helm Stephanie Karst, PhD Using a novel neonatal mouse model to identify determinants of norovirus virulence

KL2 and TL1 Presentations

presenter name Program Mentor presentation title
Jennifer Nichols, PhD KL2 Kyle Allen, PhD Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: Toward Identification of Biomechanical, Neuromuscular, and Somatosensory Mechanisms
Marie Nancy Séraphin, PhD KL2 J. Glenn Morris, Jr., MD and Michael Lauzardo, MD Longitudinal profiling of the gut microbiome during and after rifamycin-based therapy for latent tuberculosis infection
Marion Marler Bendixen, MSN, IBCLC TL1 Leslie Parker, PhD, APRN, FAAN A TL1 Team Approach to Personalization of Donor Human Milk for Preterm Infants
Natalie Harrison TL1 Graciela Lorca, PhD A TL1 Team Approach to Personalization of Donor Human Milk for Preterm Infants
Danielle Cooke TL1 Joseph McNamara, PhD “I’m Calling CPS”: Stigma surrounding postpartum mental health conditions
Rebecca Henderson, MD-PhD TL1 Peter Collings, PhD “I’m Calling CPS”: Stigma surrounding postpartum mental health conditions
Rachel Damiani TL1 Janice Krieger, PhD A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research and Quitting Tobacco Use
Nioud Gebru TL`1 Robert Leeman, PhD A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research
Adithya Gopinath TL`1 Habibeh Khashbouei, PhD A TL1 Team Approach to CNS-Localized Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease
Shaheen Farhadi TL`1 Gregory Hudalla, PhD A TL1 Team Approach to CNS-Localized Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease
Sarah Long TL1 Aysegul Gunduz, PhD A TL1 team approach to investigate attention and learning at the intracranial network level and assess the effect different cognitive rehabilitation strategies have on measures of attention and learning
Catherine Tocci TL1 William Perlstein, PhD A TL1 team approach to investigate attention and learning at the intracranial network level and assess the effect different cognitive rehabilitation strategies have on measures of attention and learning
Rachel Newsome TL1 Christian Jobin, PhD A TL1 Team approach to determine the influence of human gut microbial activities on cancer progression
Rachel Judy TL1 Stephen Coombes, PhD A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation
Kyle See TL1 Ruogu Fang, PhD A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation

UF CTSI Pilot Awardee Presentations


TL1 Teams and Presentations

“I’m Calling CPS”: Stigma surrounding postpartum mental health conditions

Rebecca Henderson, MD-PhD Candidate
Rebecca Henderson, MD-PhD Candidate College of Liberal Arts and Science, Anthropology
Danielle Cooke, PhD Candidate
Danielle Cooke, PhD Candidate College of Public Health and Health Professions, Psychology

Presenters

Danielle Cooke, PhD Candidate
Rebecca Henderson, MD-PhD

Mentors

Joseph McNamara, PhD
Peter Collings, PhD


Description

Stigma is commonly cited as a barrier to mental health treatment seeking in the postpartum. However there has been limited research into stigma surrounding postpartum depression, and no studies examining stigma in postpartum psychosis and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The present study examines reported social distance, fear, perceived dangerousness, and danger to a child when presented with a hypothetical mother experiencing a postpartum mental health condition in a nationally representative sample.

Poster

powerpoint

“I’m Calling CPS”: Stigma surrounding postpartum mental health conditions

Stigma surrounding postpartum mental health conditions

Questions or comments?


A TL1 Team Approach to CNS-Localized Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease 

Adithya Gopinath
Adithya Gopinath, B.S., PhD Candidate
Shaheen Farhadi, PhD Candidate
Shaheen Farhadi, PhD Candidate College of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

Presenters

Shaheen Farhadi, PhD Candidate 
Adithya Gopinath, B.S., PhD Candidate

Mentors

Gregory A Hudalla, PhD 
Habibeh Khoshbouei, PhD, PharmD


Description

Early clinical trials to treat patients with Parkinson’s Disease via intracranial administration of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have led to promising results including improvements in motor symptoms and increases in striatal dopamine storage. However, some patients experienced a plethora of adverse and toxic side-effects that were largely attributed to GDNF diffusion away from the target CNS tissue site. Here we present a strategy to restrict the diffusion of GDNF and improve bioactivity half-life at its intended target by endowing it with binding affinity for carbohydrates that are abundant on the cell surface and matrix via its fusion to the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-3 (Gal3).

Poster

powerpoint

A TL1 Team Approach to CNS-Localized Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

A TL1 Team Approach to CNS-Localized Delivery of Neurotrophic Factors for Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

Questions or comments?


A TL1 Team Approach to Personalization of Donor Human Milk for Preterm Infants

Natalie Harrison, PhD Candidate
Natalie Harrison, PhD Candidate, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Microbiology and Cell Science
Marion Marler Bendixen, RN, IBCLC, MSN
Marion Marler Bendixen, RN, IBCLC, MSN, College of Nursing, Nursing Research

Presenters

Marion Marler Bendixen, RN, IBCLC, MSN, PhD Candidate
Natalie Harrison, PhD Candidate

Mentors

Leslie Parker, PhD, APRN, FAAN
Graciela Lorca, PhD


Description

Often an ample supply of recently expressed or frozen mother’s own milk (MOM) is not available due to the logistics of mother’s visits or insufficient milk supply requiring the preterm infant to be supplemented with donor human milk (DHM). DHM is pasteurized, therefore lacking live commensal bacteria. This study explores the personalization of MOM through comparing fresh and frozen mother’s milk over time as an agent to inoculate DHM to obtain enriched commensal microbes similar to MOM.

Poster

powerpoint

A TL1 Team Approach to Personalization of Donor Human Milk for Preterm Infants

A TL1 Team Approach to Personalization of Donor Human Milk for Preterm Infants

Questions or comments?


A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research

Neo Gebru, MS, PhD Candidate
Neo Gebru, MS, PhD Candidate, College of Health and Human Performance, Health Behavior
Rachel Damiani, M.A., PhD Candidate
Rachel Damiani, M.A., PhD Candidate, College of Journalism & Communications, Science/Health Communications

Presenters

Rachel Damiani, M.A., PhD Candidate
Neo Gebru, MS, PhD Candidate

Mentors

Janice Krieger, PhD
Robert Leeman, PhD


Description

By interviewing rural tobacco users about their experiences engaging with research, we aim to better understand their unique challenges to ensure future research efforts are generalizable, rigorous, and representative of a diverse geographic population. Initial findings suggest that rural tobacco users have an overall positive perception of research, and many choose to participate in research for altruistic reasons (i.e. they want to help others). Further, participants noted described feeling stigmatized due to their tobacco use. Although most began smoking to fit in with their community, many now feel on the outs. Participants also reported logistical barriers to participating in research, including lack of transportation. Findings can inform the development of recruitment materials to resonate with rural adults, including by emphasizing the collective potential to help by participating. This interdisciplinary study highlights areas for collaboration to enhance the reach of health education and public health messages.

Poster

powerpoint

A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research

A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research

pdf

A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research

A TL1 Team Approach to Identify Factors Affecting Rural Tobacco Users’ Participation in Research

Questions or comments?


A TL1 Team Approach  to a Multimodal Investigation of Attention and Implicit Learning: Network Level Mechanisms and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Traumatic Brain Injury

Catherine Tocci, PhD Candidate
Catherine Tocci, PhD Candidate, College of Public Health and Health Professions, Psychology
Sarah Long, PhD Candidate
Sarah Long, PhD Candidate, College of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

Presenters

Sarah Long, PhD Candidate
Catherine Tocci, PhD Candidate

Mentors

Aysegul Gunduz, PhD
William Perlstein, PhD


Description

Description:Our project aims to investigate the network level interactions of attention and learning during an attention network task (ANT) and an implicit learning contextual cueing (CC) task. Further, we will assess the effect attention rehabilitation strategies have on behavioral and neural responses pre/post-attentional intervention

Poster

powerpoint

A TL1 Team Approach to a Multimodal Investigation of Attention and Implicit Learning: Network Level Mechanisms and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Traumatic Brain Injury

A TL1 Team Approach to a Multimodal Investigation of Attention and Implicit Learning: Network Level Mechanisms and Cognitive Rehabilitation in Traumatic Brain Injury

Questions or comments?


A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation: implications for clinical practice

Rachel Judy, PhD Candidate
Rachel Judy, PhD Candidate, College of Health Professions, Health and Human Performance
Kyle See, PhD Candidate
Kyle See, PhD Candidate, College of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

Presenters

Rachel Judy, PhD Candidate 
Kyle See,  PhD Candidate

Mentors

Stephen Coombes, PhD
Ruogu Fang, PhD


Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an intervention for patients with chronic back pain. Technological advances have led to renewed optimism in the field, but mechanisms of action in the brain remain poorly understood. Our work will utilize traditional machine learning methods such as support vector machine and more complex models including deep learning to generate interpretable features within resting EEG signals. Through machine learning, we anticipate that SCS will have a significant effect on resting alpha and beta power in the sensorimotor cortex. Our collaborative project seeks to further the application of machine learning in cognitive neuroscience and allow us to better understand how therapies for chronic pain alter resting brain activity.

Poster

PowerPoint

A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation: implications for clinical practice

A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation: implications for clinical practice

pdf

A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation: implications for clinical practice

A TL1 Team Approach on Predicting short-term and long-term effects of spinal cord stimulation: implications for clinical practice

Questions or comments?


Rachel Newsome, PhD Candidate
Rachel Newsome, PhD Candidate, College of Medicine, Cancer Biology

A TL1 Team approach to determine the influence of human gut microbial activities on cancer progression 

Presenter

Rachel Newsome, PhD Candidate 

Mentor

Christian Jobin, PhD


Description

 The objective of our TL1 grant proposal is to determine the influence of human gut microbial activities on cancer progression and therapeutic efficacy in a novel system that enables the visualization of these complex interactions.

Poster

pdf

A TL1 Team approach to determine the influence of human gut microbial activities on cancer progression

A TL1 Team approach to determine the influence of human gut microbial activities on cancer progression

Questions or comments?


KL2 Scholars and Presentations

Marie Nancy Séraphin, PhD
Marie Nancy Séraphin, PhD, College of Medicine, Department of Medicine

Longitudinal profiling of the gut microbiome during and after rifamycin-based therapy for latent tuberculosis infection

Presenter

Marie Nancy Séraphin, PhD   

Mentors

J. Glenn Morris, Jr., MD
Michael Lauzardo, MD


Description

The anti-TB drug rifampicin (RMP) exhibits highly variable serum concentration curves in different population groups, thus affecting TB treatment efficacy. Annually, 600,000 people develop resistance to RMP. There is a growing list of drugs whose pharmacokinetic properties are modified by the gut microbiota. However, our knowledge of the possible impact of biotransformation by gut microbiota on RMP exposure dose is limited. This KL2 project investigates anti-TB drug-induced changes in the gut microbiota and the effect on RMP exposure dose during latent TB therapy.

Poster

pdf

Longitudinal profiling of the gut microbiome during and after rifamycin-based therapy for latent tuberculosis infection

Anti-tuberculosis drug pharmacokinetics: the role of the gut microbiota

Questions or comments?


Jennifer A. Nichols, PhD
Jennifer A. Nichols, PhD, College of Engineering, Biomedical Engineering

Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: Toward Identification of Biomechanical, Neuromuscular, and Somatosensory Mechanisms

Presenter

Jennifer A. Nichols, PhD 

Mentor

Kyle Allen, PhD


Description

Carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC OA) is a disabling disease marked by pain and functional loss. This project aims to elucidate the biomechanical, neuromuscular, and somatosensory mechanisms that contribute to the symptomology of CMC OA by using a combination of orthopaedic biomechanics and quantitative pain testing.

Poster

pdf

Carpometacarpal Osteoarthritis: Toward Identification of Biomechanical, Neuromuscular, and Somatosensory Mechanisms

https://www.ctsi.ufl.edu/wordpress/files/2020/05/2020_05_Nichols_CTSI_ResearchDay.pdf

Questions or comments?


MD-PhD Trainees and Presentations

William Dodd
William Dodd, College of Medicine, Physiology and Functional Genomics

Adropin as a novel protective factor after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Presenter

William Dodd

Mentor

Brian Hoh, MD, MBA


Description

Dysfunctional cerebral blood vessels are a hallmark of the post-hemorrhagic stroke syndrome known as delayed cerebral ischemia. We have identified a novel protein that can help mitigate post-hemorrhagic blood vessel dysfunction.

Poster

Questions or comments?


Jonathan Cho
Jonathan Cho, College of Medicine, Anatomy and Cell Biology

Hectd3 promotes pathogenic Th17 lineage through Stat3 activation and Malt1 signaling in neuroinflammation

Presenter

Jonathan Cho, PhD

Mentor

Dorina Avram, PhD


Description

Polyubiquitination promotes proteasomal degradation, or signaling and localization, of targeted proteins. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hectd3 is necessary for pathogenic Th17 cell generation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for human multiple sclerosis. Hectd3-deficient mice have lower EAE severity, reduced Th17 program and inefficient Th17 cell differentiation. However, Stat3, but not RORγt, has decreased polyubiquitination, as well as diminished tyrosine-705 activating phosphorylation. Additionally, non-degradative polyubiquitination of Malt1, critical for NF-κB activation and Th17 cell function, is reduced. Mechanistically, Hectd3 promotes K27-linked and K29-linked polyubiquitin chains on Malt1, and K27-linked polyubiquitin chains on Stat3. Moreover, Stat3 K180 and Malt1 K648 are targeted by Hectd3 for non-degradative polyubiquitination to mediate robust generation of RORγt+IL-17Ahi effector CD4+ T cells. Thus, our studies delineate a mechanism connecting signaling related polyubiquitination of Malt1 and Stat3, leading to NF-kB activation and RORγt expression, to pathogenic Th17 cell function in EAE.

Poster

powerpoint

Hectd3 promotes pathogenic Th17 lineage through Stat3 activation and Malt1 signaling in neuroinflammation

Hectd3 promotes pathogenic Th17 lineage through Stat3 activation and Malt1 signaling in neuroinflammation

Questions or comments?


Leanne Dumeny
Leanne Dumeny, College of Pharmacy, Genetics and Genomics

NR3C2 Genotype is Associated with Spironolactone Response in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients 

Presenter

Leanne Dumeny

Mentor

Larisa Cavallari, PharmD


Description

With significant interpatient variability in response to spironolactone, an aldosterone receptor antagonist, we sought to determine if variants in genes associated with aldosterone metabolism were associated spironolactone efficacy in heart failure patients.

Poster:

PDF

NR3C2 Genotype is Associated with Spironolactone Response in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients 

NR3C2 Genotype is Associated with Spironolactone Response in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Patients 

Questions or comments?


Adam Grippin, PhD
Adam Grippin, PhD, College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery

Engineering nanoparticles to treat brain tumors

Presenter

Adam Grippin, PhD

Mentors

Duane Mitchell, MD, PhD
Jon Dobson, PhD


Description

  Cancer vaccines produce impressive responses in a subset of patients, but are limited by the inability to differentiate responders from non-responders. Here, we use nanoparticles to enable MRI-based prediction of treatment outcomes.

Poster

Questions or comments?


Aditya Mahadevan B.S.
Aditya Mahadevan, BS, College of Medicine, Applied Physiology and Kinesiology

Functional Neural Changes in Response to Head-Down Tilt Bedrest with Elevated CO2 During a Sensorimotor Dual Task

Presenter

Aditya Mahadevan, BS

Mentor

Rachael Seidler, PhD


Description

Spaceflight and microgravity cause well-characterized changes in sensory weighting processes, central fluid distribution, and musculoskeletal structure and it is important to assess how these changes affect our ability to integrate sensorimotor information. Ground-based spaceflight analogues incorporating 6° head-down tilt bedrest (HDBR) are often used to simulate microgravity and its associated physiological changes but, recently, it has been hypothesized that combining HDBR with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) might better mimic the conditions of a closed environment like the International Space Station. Dual task cost is a sensitive indicator of change in central motor function, and one that is affected by HDBR. Here, we examine how a 30-day HDBR intervention, including 0.5% ambient CO2, changes human performance and functional brain activity during single and dual task conditions. The task involved three phases in which participants i) counted the number of times an oddball stimulus was presented among distractor stimuli; ii) tapped one of two buttons in response to a visual cue at a rate of 1 Hz; and iii) performed both tasks concurrently. 11 participants (6 males) underwent functional MRI (fMRI) during the task: twice prior to HDBR+CO2, twice during HDBR+CO2, and twice following HDBR+CO2, allowing us to assess changes with HDBR+CO2 as well as subsequent recovery. Behavioral measures included reaction time and tapping accuracy during both the tapping and dual conditions, as well as counting accuracy during the counting and dual conditions. fMRI data were evaluated at an uncorrected p<.001. These exploratory analyses revealed areas following varying patterns of change and recovery, with some regions displaying only an initial change with the intervention while other regions displayed a dose-dependent effect. Across all task conditions, changes were found in the precentral, postcentral, and superior frontal gyri, all areas associated with sensorimotor or cognitive functions. Patterns of activation change as they correlate with behavioral change differed by task condition. The tapping condition showed better accuracy/shorter reaction time with more activation, but the dual task condition showed a more compensatory pattern. When compared to our previous HDBR investigation, we found that the increased ambient CO2 may have altered patterns of activation change seen throughout the brain. Together, these findings provide information about the additional and/or interactive effects of CO2 administration with HDBR and about how spaceflight conditions may impact the brain’s ability to maintain function during sensorimotor interference.

Poster

powerpoint

Functional Neural Changes in Response to Head-Down Tilt Bedrest with Elevated CO2 During a Sensorimotor Dual Task

Functional Neural Changes in Response to Head-Down Tilt Bedrest with Elevated CO2 During a Sensorimotor Dual Task poster

Questions or comments?


Emily Winesett Helm
Emily Winesett Helm, College of Medicine, Immunology and Microbiology

Using a novel neonatal mouse model to identify determinants of norovirus virulence

Presenter

Emily Winesett Helm

Mentor

Stephanie Karst, PhD


Description

Norovirus is the leading cause of severe childhood diarrhea globally and a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis for individuals of all ages. Despite its clinical relevance, very little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms underlying norovirus-induced disease. The use of the murine norovirus (MNV) model system has greatly increased our understanding of norovirus biology; however, the absence of symptoms in immunocompetent adult mice limits its utility in understanding mechanisms of disease. We recently discovered that genetically wild-type neonatal mice develop acute, self-resolving diarrhea upon infection with acute MNV-1, a disease course mirroring human norovirus pathogenesis. By using this novel neonatal mouse model, we have now been able to investigate the pathophysiological mechanisms and key cellular targets of norovirus-induced disease.

Poster

powerpoint

Using a novel neonatal mouse model to identify determinants of norovirus virulence

Using a novel neonatal mouse model to identify determinants of norovirus virulence

Questions or comments?


Henrietta Fasanya
Henrietta Fasanya, College of Medicine, Cancer Biology

Using a combination of Gangliosides and Cell Surface Vimentin as surface biomarkers for isolating Osteosarcoma Cells

Presenter

Henrietta Fasanya  

Mentors

Dietmar Siemann, PhD
Hugh Fan, PhD


Description

Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor and the third leading cause of pediatric cancer deaths. Approximately, 80% of patients will present with metastasis, however only 20% of these cases are clinically detectable at diagnosis. Current imaging modalities can only detect tumor masses of a significant size. Our group has identified novel biomarkers that can detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients. Future studies are aimed to monitor CTCs in patients over the course of their treatment and determine if there is a correlation between CTCs present and their clinical outcome.

Poster

powerpoint

Using a combination of Gangliosides and Cell Surface Vimentin as surface biomarkers for isolating Osteosarcoma Cells

Using a combination of Gangliosides and Cell Surface Vimentin as surface biomarkers for isolating Osteosarcoma Cells

Questions or comments?


Garrett Smith
Garrett Smith, College of Medicine, Neuroscience

Hippocampal Transcriptomic Profiles Reflect Strategy Selection During Cognitive Aging

Presenter

Garrett Smith

Mentor

Thomas Foster PhD


Description

Cognitive impairment is associated with differential regulation of genes linked to specific neural systems. Previous studies, however, have not identified links between behavior and transcription in the dentate gyrus. We employed a behavioral task designed to emphasize dentate function, and correlated performance on the task to transcription in the DG. We confirmed differential regulation of synaptic and neurogenesis genes in the dentate that were related to impaired performance on this putative test of dentate function in middle-age animals. This differential gene regulation may relate to the emergence of impaired hippocampal-dependent cognition with age.

Poster

powerpoint

Hippocampal Transcriptomic Profiles Reflect Strategy Selection During Cognitive Aging

Impaired Pattern Separation During Aging is Associated with Altered Hippocampal Gene Transcription

Questions or comments?


Mathew Sebastian
Mathew Sebastian, College of Medicine, Neurosurgery

Pglyrp3, a novel critical regulator of breast cancer development and metastasis

Presenter

Mathew Sebastian

Mentor

David Tran MD, PhD


Description

Though breast cancer mortality has decreased by ~40% over the past several decades, most of this improvement is within treatment of patients diagnosed with stages I-III of breast cancer. The metastatic stage IV breast cancer, however, continues to be a major life-threatening disease with little improvement in overall survival. Thus, a better understanding of the basic processes of cancer progression and eventual metastasis formation is needed with the therapeutic goal of metastasis prevention. However, identifying new targetable factors has proven elusive. Through computational analysis of RNA-Seq data generated using a spontaneous breast tumor forming murine model, peptidoglycan recognition protein 3 (Pglyrp3) was predicted to be a major regulator of breast cancer metastasis; however, it has never been described in the context of breast cancer. To determine the role of Pglyrp3 in breast cancer, we tested the genetic requirement for Pglyrp3 in breast tumor progression using cell line and mouse models of triple negative breast cancer and luminal invasive ductal carcinomas, respectively. Here, we describe the identification of Pglyrp3 as a novel breast cancer factor that plays an essential role in breast cancer progression. Using the 4T1 triple negative breast cell line in an orthotopic model, we found loss of Pglyrp3 leads to decreased tumor volumes (P<.001) and lung metastases (P<.0001) as compared to scrambled control in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised models. We then validated these observations and found that when isolated primary tumors from luminal MMTV-PyMT invasive ductal carcinoma with and without Pglyrp3 were implanted into immunocompromised mice, Pglyrp3-KO tumors were significantly smaller in size (P<.0001) with decreased lung metastases (P<.01). To assess whether the initial stages of metastasis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are rate limiting with Pglyrp3 deficient cells, we bypassed the initial stages of EMT by injecting Pglyrp3 deficient cells intravenously and found that they were able to metastasize equally as well as control cells suggesting that Pglyrp3 regulates the initial stages of EMT. Together, these data demonstrate a new role for Pgylrp3 as a novel regulator of breast cancer progression.

Poster

powerpoint

Pglyrp3, a novel critical regulator of breast cancer development and metastasis

Pglyrp3, a novel critical regulator of breast cancer development and metastasis

Questions or comments?


Aditi Patel, PhD, MPH
Aditi Patel, PhD, MPH, College of Health Outcomes & Biomedical Informatics

Participant-Driven Goal Setting in the Management of Multiple, Complex Chronic Diseases: Preliminary Findings from the Wellness Incentives Navigation (WIN) Pragmatic Clinical Trial

Presenter

Aditi Patel, PhD, MPH

Mentor

Elizabeth A. Shenkman, PhD


Description

 Goal setting between patients and providers can improve self-confidence, self-efficacy, and satisfaction with health care for individuals living with comorbid chronic diseases. There is evidence to support patient engagement in chronic disease management to improve clinical health outcomes. The purpose of our investigation is to describe and characterize participant-driven wellness goals among Medicaid enrollees as supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Poster

pdf

Participant-Driven Goal Setting in the Management of Multiple, Complex Chronic Diseases: Preliminary Findings from the Wellness Incentives Navigation (WIN) Pragmatic Clinical Trial

Participant-Driven Goal Setting in the Management of Multiple, Complex Chronic Diseases: Preliminary Findings from the Wellness Incentives Navigation (WIN) Pragmatic Clinical Trial

Questions or comments?


Frederick “Ricky” Ashby, MPH, MD-PhD Candidate
Frederick “Ricky” Ashby, MPH, MD-PhD Candidate, College of Medicine, Genetics

GRE Enhancement of AAV Does Not Improve Transduction Efficiency

Presenter

Frederick “Ricky” Ashby, MPH, MD-PhD Candidate

Mentor

Coy Heldermon, MD, PhD


Description

Previous work has suggested that AAV transduction is affected by the glucocorticoid pathway in self-complementary vectors. It remains to be established whether this can be exploited for improving AAV gene therapy. The results show that, contrary to previous unpublished work, GRE enhancement of AAV does not improve transduction efficiency.

Poster

powerpoint

GRE Enhancement of AAV Does Not Improve Transduction Efficiency

GRE Enhancement of AAV Does Not Improve Transduction Efficiency

Questions or comments?


Chu Jane Hsiao
Chu Jane Hsiao, Liberal Arts & Sciences, Anthropology

Sexual harassment experiences across the academic hierarchy

Presenter

Chu Jane Hsiao

Mentor

Connie Mulligan, PhD


Environments that fortify power dynamics are more likely to foster and sustain sexual harassment. Current estimates suggest there is little difference in prevalence of experiences in medical students, residents, and faculty. However, it remains unclear how recall bias and differences in time queried impact these numbers. We surveyed trainees and faculty within the same institutional culture about sexual harassment experiences in 2018. We found a consistent trend whereby medical students were most likely and faculty were least likely to experience sexual harassment.

Poster

Questions or comments?


Lindsey Palm
Lindsey Palm, College of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Determining how early after surgery should we study total knee arthroplasty mechanics?

Presenter

Lindsey Palm

Mentor

Scott Banks, PhD


Description

 Fluoroscopic knee kinematics of a total knee arthroplasty design at 6-12 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery.

Poster

pdf

Determining how early after surgery should we study total knee arthroplasty mechanics?

Determining how early after surgery should we study total knee arthroplasty mechanics?

Questions or comments?


Puchong Thirawatananond
Puchong Thirawatananond, College of Medicine, Pathology

Generation of islet-reactive Tregs to prevent diabetes in NOD mice

Presenter

Puchong Thirawatananond

Mentor

Todd Brusko, PhD


Description

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease leading to major complications despite advancements in glucose monitoring and exogenous insulin. Adoptive cell therapy with polyclonal Tregs have been proven to be safe, but have lacked efficacy in outcome measures of T1D prevention. This research seeks to improve adoptive Treg cell therapy by providing islet antigen-specificity while preventing potential adverse events due to TCR chain mispairing.

Poster

powerpoint

Generation of islet-reactive Tregs to prevent diabetes in NOD mice

Generation of islet-reactive Tregs to prevent diabetes in NOD mice

Questions or comments?


Yuxing Xia, BS
Yuxing Xia, BS, College of Medicine, Neuroscience

Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies

Presenter

Yuxing Xia, BS

Mentor

Benoit Giasson, PhD


Description

Tau protein abnormally aggregates in tauopathies, a diverse group of neurologic diseases that includes Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In early stages of disease, tau becomes hyperphosphorylated and mislocalized, which can contribute to its aggregation and toxicity. Supporting the involvement of pSer208 in tau pathology, a novel monoclonal antibody 3G12 specific for tau phosphorylation at Ser208 revealed strong reactivity of tau inclusions in the brains of PS19 and rTg4510 transgenic mouse models of tauopathy. 3G12 also labelled neurofibrillary tangles in brains of patients with AD but revealed differential staining compared to CP13 and 7F2 for other types of tau pathologies such as in neuropil threads and neuritic plaques in AD, tufted astrocytes in progressive supranuclear palsy and astrocytic plaques in corticobasal degeneration. These results support the hypothesis that tau phosphorylation at Ser208 strongly contributes to unique types of tau aggregation and may be a reliable marker for the presence of mature neuronal tangles.

Poster

powerpoint

Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies

Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies

pdf

Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies

Tau Phosphorylation of Ser208 Promotes Aggregation of Wild Type tau in Alzheimer’s disease and Other Tauopathies

Questions or comments?


Zachary Krumm
Zachary Krumm, College of Medicine, Neuroscience

Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease

Presenter

Zachary Krumm

Mentor

Todd E. Golde, MD, PhD


Description

Central Corticotropin family signalling as well as activation of the HPA-Axis results in significant alterations in metabolic, immune, and gene regulatory function. Targeting these pathways to modulate treatment for chronic disease, either as a monotherapy or as a treatment adjuvant, has emerged as a promising avenue in neurodegenerative, metabolic, and potentially oncologic paradigms. We have developed a monoclonal antibody that targets Corticotropin Relasing Hormone (CRH) for use as both a therepuetic intervention and a research tool to further explore the role of stress metabolism in the progression of chronic disease and behavior.

Poster

Powerpoint

Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease

Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease

pdf

Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease

Targeting Corticotropin Peptide Family In Treatment Of Neurodegenerative, Metabolic, and Oncological Disease

Questions or comments?


Dan Stribling
Dan Stribling, College of Medicine, Genetics & Genomics

Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology

Presenter

Dan Stribling

Mentor

Rolf Renne, PhD


Description

This work describes ongoing bioinformatics methods development to empower discovery of new drivers of via the noncoding transcriptome. Set primarily in the context of Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus, this poster describes the development of bioinformatics tools to unlock the potential of recent ribonomics techniques such as qCLASH for miRNA discovery, miRNA targetome characterization, and lncRNA annotation.

Poster

poiwerpoint

Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology

Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology

pdf

Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology

Interrogating the Cancer Noncoding Transcriptome via Novel Bioinformatics Methodology

Questions or comments?


Binh Nguyen, BS
Binh Nguyen, BS, College of Medicine, Neuroscience

Visual Mismatch Negativity and Structural Connectivity in Hoarding Disorder

Presenter

Binh Nguyen, BS

Mentor

Carol Mathews, MD


Description

Hoarding disorder (HD) is a psychiatric illness characterized by difficulty and distress with discarding items of minimal value and accumulation of clutter that reduces quality of life and functional use of living spaces. Because HD was only recently defined as a distinct disorder in the DSM-5, we lack a full understanding of its underlying neurobiology. Thus our group is studying visual mismatch negativity, an EEG waveform reflecting environmental change detection/perceptual accuracy that may be impaired in HD, as well as probing structural brain changes via neuroimaging that could serve as objective biomarkers and correspond to HD symptomatology and severity.

Poster

powerpoint

Visual Mismatch Negativity and Structural Connectivity in Hoarding Disorder

Visual Mismatch Negativity and Structural Connectivity in Hoarding Disorder

Questions or comments?


Pilot Awardees and Presentations

Mike Killian, PhD, MSW
Mike Killian, PhD, MSW, Florida State University, College of Social Work

Machine learning-based prediction of health outcomes in pediatric organ transplantation recipients: A study of single transplant center

Presenter

Mike Killian, PhD, MSW   

CO-PI

Zhe He, PhD   


Description

The purpose of the current study was to test and examine ML models predicting the experience of hospitalization and mortality in samples of pediatric kidney, liver, and heart transplant recipients from a large solid organ transplant program. Preliminary results from this study will inform work with national transplant data and pediatric data from OneFlorida Data Network.

Poster

powerpoint

Machine learning-based prediction of health outcomes in pediatric organ transplantation recipients: A study of single transplant center

Machine learning-based prediction of health outcomes in pediatric organ transplantation recipients: A study of single transplant center

Questions or comments?


Tian Lin, PhD
Tian Lin, PhD, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training in Aging: An Individualized Training Protocol Facilitates Neurofeedback Success

Presenter

Tian Lin, PhD

Mentor

Natalie Ebner, PhD


Description

This pilot data showed the first evidence that some older adults can learn to up-regulate brain activity in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex via real-time fMRI based neurofeedback training during a selective attention task.

Poster

powerpoint

Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training in Aging: An Individualized Training Protocol Facilitates Neurofeedback Success

Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training in Aging: An Individualized Training Protocol Facilitates Neurofeedback Success

Questions or comments?


About Kafui Dzirasa, MD, PhD

Kafui Dzirasa completed a PhD in Neurobiology at Duke University. His research interests focus on understanding how changes in the brain produce neurological and mental illness, and his graduate work has led to several distinctions including the Somjen Award for Most Outstanding Dissertation Thesis, the Ruth K. Broad Biomedical Research Fellowship, the UNCF·Merck Graduate Science Research Fellowship, and the Wakeman Fellowship. Kafui obtained an MD from the Duke University School of Medicine in 2009, and he completed residency training in General Psychiatry in 2016.

Kafui received the Charles Johnson Leadership Award in 2007, and he was recognized as one of Ebony magazine’s 30 Young Leaders of the Future in February 2008. He has also been awarded the International Mental Health Research Organization Rising Star Award, the Sydney Baer Prize for Schizophrenia Research, and his laboratory was featured on CBS 60 Minutes in 2011. In 2016, he was awarded the inaugural Duke Medical Alumni Emerging Leader Award and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers: The Nation’s highest award for scientists and engineers in the early stages of their independent research careers. In 2017, he was recognized as 40 under 40 in Health by the National Minority Quality Forum, and the Engineering Alumni of the Year from UMBC. He was induced into the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2019.

Kafui has served as an Associate Scientific Advisor for the journal Science Translational Medicine, a member of the Congressional-mandated Next Generation Research Initiative, and on the NIH Director’s guiding committee for the BRAIN Initiative. He currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for TEDMED.

Kafui is an Associate Professor at Duke University with appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, and Neurosurgery. His ultimate goal is to combine his research, medical training, and community experience to improve outcomes for diverse communities suffering from Neurological and Psychiatric illness.